4.5.20

The Half Of It: We Were All Teenagers Once

Hi guys! Let's not forget and celebrate the fact that I just wrote yesterday and I wrote something again! Like a lumpia, I'm on a roll!

Today we will be discussing the new Netflix movie, The Half of It, which boasts another Asian lead and a slight touch of girl-on-girl love. I was really having a hard time writing about it because I was debating with myself as to whether I like it or not. In the end, please read the entire post to know about the end. Lol.

The movie left me really confused. I was ready to write about it so negatively because of how I felt after watching it. Yes, kudos to Netflix for really spending a lot to make their content diverse and inclusive, but that didn't stop me from feeling my feelings. I was ready to write down my review but decided to puff a quick smoke just to collect my thoughts and also think of high falluting falutin words to include in my review. 


While smoking I started recollecting all the stupid things I did when I was in high school. How I such an angsty, angry, albeit law-abiding, teenager. And then I realized why I didn't like the movie; because I am old and I know better now (still subject for debate but). Also, I realized that Netflix is not creating content for the sole purpose of my entertainment (I wish they do), but for everyone. And that is ultimately what diversity and inclusivity are all about.

The Half of It is about Ellie, Paul, and Aster and their bizarre love triangle. Truth be told, knowing what I know now (I keep saying this like I know a lot but I really don't) I'd call this movie a glorified catfishing, but make it retro. Retro because writing letters and texting is such a forgotten form of communication (texting maybe not so much but still underused). Anyway, so the story goes like this: Paul likes Aster so he asked Ellie to help him write letters. Throughout the process, Ellie also falls in love with Aster, and then Paul realized that he's in love with Ellie. So high school, right?


The plot actually reminds of Sierra Burgess Is a Loser which also about someone pretending to be someone else. Which again, in today's term is catfishing, and it's not okay. But part of me understands the need to pretend because who was not pretentious in high school? Give me the name of someone that was so sure of who they are during high school. I mean, I'm not even sure who I am and I'm in my late twenties. 

I know it doesn't justify the means, but come on! We've all been to high school and we know how stupid our thought process was back then. I wanted to run away because we didn't have a water connection and my Aunt kept asking me to fetch water. I was very serious, I packed clothes and I was crying talking to my Mom on the phone telling her about my plan. Now tell me, is that smart? Is that mature? Right.

What hits close to home is seeing how Ellie falls in love with Aster letter after letter. It was a familiar feeling that I wish to feel again. Its a process not always shown in mainstream media which is weird because it is exactly how straight people fall in love. I wish to see it more often so that more people could see and understand that falling in love with the same sex is totally the same as how everyone else falls in love. 


The music is good, the performances were good too. It's smart with tons of references. It's funny enough to warrant some laugh (Trig is such a character). There might some questionable happenings in the movie but overall, it is a fine film. So if ever you're in the mood to reminisce high school love, this might be the film for you. 

Stream The Half of It on Netflix!


Cheers,


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